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Kitsby X Chris Cheung:  The Damn Good! Joong Kit + Cookbook
Kitsby X Chris Cheung:  The Damn Good! Joong Kit + Cookbook
Kitsby X Chris Cheung:  The Damn Good! Joong Kit + Cookbook
Kitsby X Chris Cheung:  The Damn Good! Joong Kit + Cookbook
Kitsby X Chris Cheung:  The Damn Good! Joong Kit + Cookbook
Kitsby X Chris Cheung:  The Damn Good! Joong Kit + Cookbook
Kitsby X Chris Cheung:  The Damn Good! Joong Kit + Cookbook
$74.99

Kitsby X Chris Cheung: The Damn Good! Joong Kit + Cookbook

We’ve collaborated with Chris Cheung, founder of East Wind Snack Shop & food personality, to bring you The Damn Good! Joong Kit!

It’s all-inclusive of everything you’ll need to make hearty joongs (flavorful Chinese bamboo leaf-wrapped sticky rice packages) in your own kitchen!

Popularly made & eaten during the Chinese Dragon Boat Festival season, you too can experience the delicious fun of this dish, a featured recipe in Chef Chris’ cookbook.

Bundle includes the full kit, Chris' new cookbook, Damn Good Chinese Food, AND exclusive early-bird access to an digital live walkthrough of the kit with Chris himself!*

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Only left in stock

Chef Chris Cheung was born and raised in New York’s Chinatown, which was the inspiration for his highly acclaimed restaurant, East Wind Snack Shop and his new book, Damn Good Chinese Food. He has over 20 years of experience as a chef in NYC and cooked in Shenjiamen, China. You can catch him regularly appearing on The Food Network, and on multiple episodes of Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations, as well as on Epicurious.com & Bonappetit.com.

SERVINGS: 4-6 joongs
LEVEL: Advanced
PREP TIME: 50 minutes
COOK TIME: 45 minutes to 1 hour

This hearty snack is a popular home dish and also widely available as a street food item and is also a specialty during Chinese holidays and the Dragon Boat Festivals. It highlights the brilliance of the creation of dried and preserved foods that were integral to survival in pre-modern times in China. These preserved foods are delicacies that are now favorite ingredients in Chinese cooking.

CULTURAL TIDBITS: The name of the dish has various names such as “joong” in Cantonese, “zongzi” in Mandarin, etc. Along with the differences in naming, there are regional varieties in fillings & flavors from the Shanghainese addition of spices, to the Nyonya (Chinese-Malaysian) addition of butterfly pea flower-tinted blue & candied winter melon, and many more. Beyond regional variations, families also sometimes have their own unique little details that pass down from generation to generation. However, no matter the variant, what stays constant is the warmth it brings to your stomach, memory, and heart!

Ingredients:

For the Filling:
1 ⅓ cups of sticky rice (Extra ⅓ cup provided in case of spillage, practice, etc.!)
2 pcs Chinese sausage [Lap Cheong; 腊肠]
1 cup thinly sliced Chinese bacon [Lap yuk; 臘肉]
4 pcs shitake mushrooms
¼ cup dried shrimp
2 Tbsp dried scallop
4 tbsp mushroom soy sauce

For Wrapping:
6 bamboo leaves
6 strings

Tools:
2 Large Bowls (1 for soaking rice & 1 for soaking leaves)
1 Small Bowl (to soak mushrooms)
1 Cutting Board
1 Knife
1 Spoon
1 Pot

Contains: Seafood, Shellfish, Soy

ABOUT CHEF CHRIS CHEUNG

Chef Chris Cheung was born and raised in New York’s Chinatown, which was the inspiration for his highly acclaimed restaurant, East Wind Snack Shop and his new book, Damn Good Chinese Food. He has over 20 years of experience as a chef in NYC and cooked in Shenjiamen, China. You can catch him regularly appearing on The Food Network, and on multiple episodes of Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservations, as well as on Epicurious.com & Bonappetit.com.

ABOUT THIS RECIPE

SERVINGS: 4-6 joongs
LEVEL: Advanced
PREP TIME: 50 minutes
COOK TIME: 45 minutes to 1 hour

This hearty snack is a popular home dish and also widely available as a street food item and is also a specialty during Chinese holidays and the Dragon Boat Festivals. It highlights the brilliance of the creation of dried and preserved foods that were integral to survival in pre-modern times in China. These preserved foods are delicacies that are now favorite ingredients in Chinese cooking.

CULTURAL TIDBITS: The name of the dish has various names such as “joong” in Cantonese, “zongzi” in Mandarin, etc. Along with the differences in naming, there are regional varieties in fillings & flavors from the Shanghainese addition of spices, to the Nyonya (Chinese-Malaysian) addition of butterfly pea flower-tinted blue & candied winter melon, and many more. Beyond regional variations, families also sometimes have their own unique little details that pass down from generation to generation. However, no matter the variant, what stays constant is the warmth it brings to your stomach, memory, and heart!

WHAT'S INCLUDED

Ingredients:

For the Filling:
1 ⅓ cups of sticky rice (Extra ⅓ cup provided in case of spillage, practice, etc.!)
2 pcs Chinese sausage [Lap Cheong; 腊肠]
1 cup thinly sliced Chinese bacon [Lap yuk; 臘肉]
4 pcs shitake mushrooms
¼ cup dried shrimp
2 Tbsp dried scallop
4 tbsp mushroom soy sauce

For Wrapping:
6 bamboo leaves
6 strings

WHAT YOU'LL NEED

Tools:
2 Large Bowls (1 for soaking rice & 1 for soaking leaves)
1 Small Bowl (to soak mushrooms)
1 Cutting Board
1 Knife
1 Spoon
1 Pot

ALLERGEN INFORMATION

Contains: Seafood, Shellfish, Soy




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